Heart Talks

Charles Naylor, 1920

A Volume of Confidential Talks on the Problems, Privileges, and Duties of the Christian Life Designed to Comfort, Encourage, Strengthen and Instruct.

The author of "Heart Talks" has been peculiarly qualified for his task by the training of his soul in the school of suffering. As a young evangelist, Naylor was injured in an accident. For forty-one years as an invalid, he lay day and night on a bed of pain as a constant sufferer.
 

Why I Believe the Old Book

The Final Retrospect!

Contentment

The Practical Side of Religion

Putting Clouds over the Sun

The Sculptor's Work!

How to Overcome Disappointment

Following "Wherever"

Getting the Kernel!

Being Easily Entreated

It Pleased the Lord to Bruise Him

The Shepherd Psalm

Blighted Blossoms

Doing Something Worth While

What it Means to Trust the Lord

Two Ways of Seeing

Home-Made Clouds

How to Fertilize Love

Blowing the Clouds Away

Baptized with Fire!

My Dream Message

Three Necessary Rations

The Living Bible

Paul's Persuasion

In Christ, and in Ephesus

Do You Need Patience?

Stumbling-stones, or Stepping-stones?

Use What You Have!

Joy in Trials

Sponges and Watering-cans

The Big End of Trouble

Self-made Barriers

How to Work God's Joy-machine

Two Ways of Rising

Getting Even

Do You Know Yourself?

Who Wears the Halter

The Road to Happiness

Singing in Adversity

The Blessing of Dissatisfaction

How to Keep out of Trouble

Meeting the Lions

Egg-Shell Christians

What Is Your Word Worth?

What the Redbird Told Me

What to Do with the Devil

Waiting on the Lord

A Retreat or a Rout?

When God Withdraws Himself

What Happened to Solomon

How Are Your Ear Connections?

Do Not Fret

But Jesus Sent Him Away

Two Sunsets

Balkers

Be Brave

Heeding Intuitional Warnings

Divine and Worldly Conformity

Three Tests of Love

What Old Bill Could Not Do

 

CONCERNING THE AUTHOR
The author of "Heart Talks" has been peculiarly qualified for his task by the training of his soul in the school of suffering. As a young evangelist, Naylor was injured in an accident. For forty-one years as an invalid, he lay day and night on a bed of pain as a constant sufferer. He has known the experience of long and intense suffering with no hope of relief from any human source, and with no other prospect for the future than that of remaining a helpless invalid for life and without a means of earning a livelihood. He has learned to trust God for the supply of his temporal needs because there was no other to trust. He has learned to commune with God by being deprived of the opportunity of mingling much with his fellow men. Yet he has not lost the joy out of life. He still does what he can to build up the kingdom of God and bless his fellow men by his words of good cheer. He is still interested in the events of the world, and especially in the progress of God's work. He has demonstrated the efficacy of God's grace to sustain one and give joy in the very discouraging circumstances of life.

Though a firm believer in divine healing, and instrumental in the healing of those who kneel at his bedside for prayer, yet he has not received permanent healing, because, as he believes, this is God's method of developing his heart and making him more useful in helping others. During the last five years, especially, he has contributed regularly to a religious periodical articles on subjects similar to those in this book, besides conducting a "Questions Answered" and information department, and writing a number of books.
 

PREFACE
Most of the miscellaneous writings of which this volume is composed, appeared originally in serial form. The widespread interest produced by them, the hundreds of letters of appreciation, and the numerous earnest requests for their publication in permanent form have been the moving cause for their presentation in this volume. They cover a very wide range of topics, are written in a popular style, and deal with phases of life and personal experience that are all too much neglected but which every Christian needs to understand. Each paper is complete in itself, though all have a general relation. They are pastoral in nature and have by the blessings of God comforted, encouraged, strengthened, and enlightened many souls. That they may by divine help continue to be a blessing to many, is the earnest desire of the Author.
Charles Naylor
Anderson, Indiana, May 14, 1920